Michael Jordan Reputation Rights Case Begins in Shanghai

April 29, 2013

Normally I wouldn’t bother you with the news that a case I have already discussed many times has kicked off. No real news to report here, at least not yet. However, after reading the coverage in Xinhua, I just felt obligated to pass along this little treasure from the alleged infringer’s crack legal team:

The defendants argued that the word “Qiaodan” is simply a translation of the common surname “Jordan,” instead of the full name of the former NBA player. The real intention of using the Chinese name “Qiaodan” is to mean “grass and trees in the south,” said lawyers for the Qiaodan Sports.

You might be thinking these guys are hacks, but I’d like to disabuse you of that notion. Only true professionals can issue statements like that with a straight face. That sort of in-your-face, unabashed bullshit is a work of art. I know that if called upon, I would be unable to put forward that argument without erupting into belly laughs. My ass would be fired immediately.

Kudos to those lawyers. They are true professional advocates, and a credit to our profession.

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